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Roger

NORWICH, United Kingdom
  • 9
  • reviews
  • 18
  • helpful votes
  • 16
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1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-14

Truly awful narrator

Avoid this audiobook like the plague!

The subject is quite acceptable. but a little dry, but the book is ruined. destroyed even, by the terrible narrator. He actually manages to get you to focus on his dreadful mistakes so much that it overshadows the story.
He was so bad I started to take notes of his mis-pronunciations, but there were so many I gave up! I would understand someone to have a little trouble with some Russian names, but Tom Parks pronounces the same name differently (and all wrongly) several different times even in the same paragraph. It's highly unprofessional and really shows a slap-dash attitude to his work. German and Russian names are mangled dreadfully. Some he doesn't even pronounce as they are spelled, meaning he couldn't even be bothered to try.

Its very sad, and I won't be buying any more books narrated by him.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-08-13

Interesting, but needs editing.

Overall I liked this book. The beginning I found rather frustrating though, and nearly gave up. I am glad I didn't though.
I don't like books that frequently say that they will be talking further about a particular topic later. At the beginning the book is full of "we'll explore that later" and "you will learn in chapter x more about this" and, the most over-used of all "as we will see later".

The other big niggle is that there were quite a number of repetitions. I think the work should have been checked over by someone else with a view to cutting these out as unnecessary and to make the book more digestible.
It's rather disorganised too, and the author takes a while to decide whether the book is about him, his career (he touts himself a bit!) or the historical subject. It's untidy.

By the 4th (chapter/part - I lost track!) I warmed to the author. He has taken a subject that needs much more coverage and he has really researched thoroughly. Why haven't more authors considered where political correctness came from? In "Marxism, Multiculturalism and Free Speech" Dr Frank Ellis points out that the first person to use this phrase was Lenin.
Douglas Pratt has taken up where Dr Ellis left off, and I'm glad he did.

Stick with it!

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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-13

Very interesting.

This is an important audiobook to listen to if you have any interest in the Vietnam War. Robertson Dean read it excellently, as usual, with only a couple of mispronunciations (primmer instead of primer and other trivial errors).
John Vann was THE Vietnam expert, and the book also exposes what drove him and his difficult childhood.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-02-13

Good

Enjoyable, and balanced. Well up to Beevor's usual standard. An almost forgotten part of recent European history.

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4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-02-13

Informative and quite enjoyable

I listened to this after the excellent M Stanton Evans book on Senator McCarthy, which really opened my eyes to the media lies told about him.

It's a little dry in places, as there are lots of lists of names (necessarily when talking about spy rings), but well worth buying and downloading.

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0 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-12

Very good

Good, well researched book free of the left wing blinkers that lots of authors seem to put on when they write about Vietnam. I kept thinking I'd heard the last chapter, but there was more and more additional information.
Very well narrated. Narrator has a pleasing Aussie accent, and good delivery that makes the occasional humourous sentences even funnier.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-01-12

Interesting

Very interesting and though-provoking. I bought the hardback copy after listening to this audiobook just so I could refer to it occasionally and look at his sources.
After reading books by former GRU spy and Spetsnaz man Victor Suvorov, then this, it puts a new perspective on the war.

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2 of 3 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-09-11

Good

Good, well narrated book. The narrator did some great impersonations of the characters in the book. Very talented man.

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6 of 9 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-09-11

OK, but rather spoilt by narrator

An area of history I knew little about so I was pleased to find this book. The rather breathy, exclaimation style of the narrator was a bit off-putting though. It was as if he was narrating for a childrens book. Perhaps a bit of audio "proof reading" would have helped too - he said Australian instead of Austrian once or twice.
Well researched though, and recommended. I will Google some pictures of the mountain fighting to get an idea of what it looked like.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful