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1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-08-18

Inconsistent, simplistic, unfocused unidirectional

This book desperately needed an editor a critical editor that has read some books or understand what the plot of a book should be about.
The so-called reviewers on the cover of this book are just the mercenary advertisement for a product that will make the writer cringe in the future.
What this book is not about is a vision of any kind, the main character has a list over three hundred and ninety rules for seeing we get to know maybe ten; also we are told at infinitum that vision is a language (the main character is a translator, so apparently everything is a language ).
The only surprise is that the thriller is no thrilling, the relationships are at best absurd at worst the most boring sexual couples ever, and the bony boiler of the story is so pathetic and poorly described it was hard to believe no one told the writer he/she had to start again. Just one example the knife he uses is a serrated bread knife; I will never look at toast the same way, the horror, the horror.
A waste of time and money, the worst book I read this year. .


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4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-08-18

A good beginning to the end life 2.0

Definitions and concepts to ideas that are changing the world while humanity fights over gods and philosophies of other centuries, the shock will hit so hard it will change everything or everything will burn.
Politicians are pushing for population growth to stimulate economies and importing humans with retrograde religions to boost modern societies while these societies are advancing modes of technology that will diminish the necessity of ever-growing numbers of human to stimulate economies, and by the very nature of this technologies and sciences contradicting the exitance of god and our own importance as biological beings in this plane of reality. Time to have science influence politics a lot more than just as a possible future, but because science is the main engine of the future good or bad, and having social change created by half blind demagogs will not put us in line with the future shock.
Excelente expose of how our world is changing and how little of this information is bleeding into the general public as a possible total game changer.

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4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-08-18

A good beginning

A good start to a new series, with an interesting female character that is likeable and has lots of promise.
A tighter detective story less defined by atmospherics even when encountering a character from the other series.
I like this writer and his style in general but the Edinburgh series took to long to define itself and its reality with one foot in horror and but all the rest in reality, this one seems more grounded and more accessible to follow its logic.


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4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-05-18

Defining reality when illusions become flesh

Reading this book for the second time made some things more clear and also more in depth, my expectations and time have placed me in a better place to appreciate this novel more. I would recommend not watching any of the film versions they are all deeply flawed.

This is a book that explores several concepts profoundly and intelligently. What is reality and how do you know or test your perceptions of it? What is human and what makes it human? Can a world be a life form a consciousness? Can intelligence manifest in incomprehensible ways? Is matter a definition of what we, are or do we become more when we acquire consciousness and memories?

It is one of those works that at first seems about individual struggles, but in reality, is touching in very profound questions of exploration an understanding of what we confront in an alien environment and alien intelligence.

A book that gets better with time.


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2 of 3 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-05-18

A very hard to sustain conceit or device.

Here is a story that is a kind of science fiction, come detective story, come horror tale but not any of them, in the end, it is just a writers device to spice up a story of redemption and forgiveness. It felt contrived and claustrophobic and repetitive (but that was the warning the title gave), I kept on thinking let's get to the point, and I and the character would be taken back to the same point of the story viewed from a different angle, which did not open any new understandings.

Too much like as nightmare and too long within a conundrum that has no logic except for the one given by the author. It may be fascinating to create this world as a writer, but as a reader, I found it frustrating and without much reward, because in the end, everything had to be explained by one of the characters for it to be understood and have a logic that explained what had happened repeatedly.

Too stylized to feel connected to the character and too repetitive to care for the final outcome. I do not mind putting a bit of hard work for literature, but entertainment should not be this difficult.

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40 of 43 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-05-18

Finding secrets can kill your soul


A dark, brooding story with a dark, brooding character that looks for the truth no one wants to find, in a world where good and evil are hard to discern, no heroes but plenty of villains and victims.

A bleak modern detective story told in black and white, that is never boring and full of turns and twists to create a world where corruption is the norm.

Noir of the darkest kind.

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2 of 3 people found this review helpful

2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-05-18

Generalities this big are racist in themselves

The title is the most significant pointer of its message it equates white peoples tears with crocodile tears, would that be permissible to do to any other people? How dehumanising of and an entire group of people.

A book that could have been better if it staid in a microcosm or a personal arena, but no, it intends deliberately and insidiously to paint all people of a race as racist by nature or condemned by the action of their ancestors to be racist. That in itself is the problem with racism, the tarnishing and blaming of an entire race on the bases of skin colour, and perceived shortcomings; and that in my eyes makes this book a racist book.

Seth and Carter the main characters of the story are two very different persons, that happen to be white but are both condemned equally by the writer because they are white. Here is the litmus test; if the two characters were black and under a similar set of circumstances this book would not be published, or all would vilify it.
When did it become permissible to be racist to one set of people? Or are people incapable of reading the subtext and consequences of this kind of hate? When will we learn?

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2 of 4 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-05-18

Not Bond but son Jonas son.



A very entertaining spy story without the usual formulaic, the setting is contemporary, and the paranoia is eternal. Jonas wants to save his father, but the government he works for will not negotiate with terrorist, the dilemma is simple for him, he will rescue him at any cost, you never quite know how far Jonas will go because Jonas is making it up as he goes along.
Smart and human, with the cunning use of knowledge and strategy against larger forces, a good read.

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3 of 4 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-04-18

Religion as metaphors, archetypes, and allegory

A dissertation that is trying to reestablish our understanding of our culture so we may save our souls. Not the ghost of us but the purpose in us, creating a connection with our very humanity by using the thousands of years of inner knowledge we have stored in stories, and the millions of years the very nature of our biology gives us as it shapes us.

“In the West, we have been withdrawing from our tradition-, religion- and even nation-centred cultures, partly to decrease the danger of group conflict. But we are increasingly falling prey to the desperation of meaninglessness, and that is no improvement at all.”
― Jordan B. Peterson, 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos

Culturally profound, politically irreverent, painfully truthful, a dare to confront life with eyes wide open and the chest bared to take all the arrows life will give, a celebration of our mortality by assigning meaning to our very short lives.

Beautifull and mining full even when you do not agree because it has the force of a man that loves life, his culture, the truth, and humanity.

This is a book that is even better when heard because Jordan Peterson himself gives the dissertation, the eloquence, and the passion only the author can provide, you hear how much emotion there is in his words, and sometimes you listen to a man moved to tears by this words.

“To stand up straight with your shoulders back is to accept the terrible responsibility of life, with eyes wide open. It means deciding to voluntarily transform the chaos of potential into the realities of habitable order. It means adopting the burden of self-conscious vulnerability, and accepting the end of the unconscious paradise of childhood, where finitude and mortality are only dimly comprehended. It means willingly undertaking the sacrifices necessary to generate a productive and meaningful reality (it means acting to please God, in the ancient language).”
― Jordan B. Peterson, 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos

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3 of 6 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-04-18

Oh! What A Tangled Web We Weave


A well-developed plot and characters that seem real and compelling, but a bit disturbing, as the theme is paedophilia and relationships like Lolita, where love and prohibited erotism are a poison that spreads from one generation to the next.
The writer and writing are not exploitative, but the subject is what it is and feels a bit icky; so be warned.
It also works as a murder mystery that is a bit more of a psychodrama.

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3 of 4 people found this review helpful