Summary

The classic real-life story of the superspy whose vast intelligence network helped defeat the Nazis in World War II.
A Man Called Intrepid is the account of the world’s first integrated intelligence operation and of its master, William Stephenson. Codenamed INTREPID by Winston Churchill, Stephenson was charged with establishing and running a vast, worldwide intelligence network to challenge the terrifying force of Nazi Germany. Nothing less than the fate of Britain and the free world hung in the balance as INTREPID covertly set about stalling the Nazis by any means necessary.
First published in 1976, A Man Called Intrepid was an immediate bestseller. With over thirty black-and-white photographs and countless World War II secrets, this book revealed startling information that had remained buried for decades. Detailing the infamous Camp X training center in Ontario, Canada; the miraculous breaking of the Ultra Code used by the Enigma Machine; and dozens of other stories of clandestine missions, A Man Called Intrepid is an undisputed modern classic.
PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.
©1982, 2000, 2009, 2014 William Stevenson (P)2014 Audible, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Denis on 12-04-15

Intriguing and insightful...

A fascinating and throughly interesting account of WW II secret operations and historical background to the major events of the time.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Lasse on 24-06-14

A must read for everyone interested in history

Where does A Man Called Intrepid rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

The most interesting book I have read about ww2 history. It reveals the story behind the ordinary wartime history.

What did you like best about this story?

This book is not about one spy. It tells the story about the british spy network and its operations during the war.

What does David McAlister bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

David McAlister read in a very clear and "dry" stryle very well suited to the story.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I felt I for the first time had been told the true story and hidden connections behind all the events I studied for my degree in history 40 years ago.

Any additional comments?

Read this book before you read any other book about ww2. It nay save you a lot of misunderstanding of the events.

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7 of 8 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Mary Francis Evans on 20-08-17

One of THE most important works about WWII

This work is indispensable to building a fuller understanding of WWII. It fills in many gaps that more standard combat and political histories leave open, often unwittingly.

My one gripe about the book is that it is extremely anti-Chamberlain and just as extremely pro-Churchill. Not to take away one iota from Churchill, but Chamberlain's cursed "appeasement"--and Stevenson does pretty much use it as a curse word--is condemned time and again with only a very glancing acknowledgement that Britain was not ready for war before 1939. Furthermore, Stevenson gives not even a nod to the fact that Chamberlain's government oversaw the building up of the RAF, the establishment of the Chain Home series of radar stations, and the centrally controlled communications network of Fighter Command, all of which were essential to winning the Battle of Britain. In short, the appeasement of Hitler bought essential time for Britain to prepare.

That gripe aside I found the book absolutely riveting from beginning to end and recommend it highly and without hesitation.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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