Summary

Andrew Carnegie, whose lifetime spanned the era from the beginning of the Industrial Revolution to the First World War was America's first modern titan. In this magnificent biography, celebrated historian David Nasaw brings to life this period of unprecedented transition - a time of self-made millionaires, scabs, strikes, and a new kind of philanthropy - through the fascinating rags-to-riches story of one of our most iconic business legends. The Scottish-born son of a failed weaver and a mother who supported the family by binding shoes, Andrew Carnegie was the embodiment of the American dream. In his rise from a job as a bobbin boy in a cotton factory to being the richest man in the world, he was single-minded, relentless, and a major player in some of the most violent and notorious labor strikes of the time. The prototype of today's billionaire, he was a visionary in the way he earned his money and in the way he gave it away.
Nasaw explains how Carnegie made his fortune and how he tried to pull the world back from a war he predicted. Brimming with new material, personal letters, diaries, prenuptial agreements, letters to and from presidents and prime ministers, Nasaw plumbs the core of this fascinating man, fixing him in his place as one of the most compelling, elusive, and multifaceted personalities of the 20th century.
©2006 David Nasaw (P)2007 Gildan Media Corp
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Critic reviews

"This is biography on the grand scale." ( Washington Post Book World)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By ganiyu on 13-11-12

A riveting book.

A well researched and insightful account of the now iconic Andrew Carnegie.

Riveting and one that you will probably come back to again.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Simon on 01-05-18

The Little Scotsman

You know his name, now listen to his story.

You think you knew him, but this book shines a light on to the dissing world of one of the world's greatest titans and the methods used to build his empire.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Peggie on 01-10-07

Andrew Carnegie

Fascinating! The author tells the good, the bad and the ugly about Carnegie, explaining the times and the laws. As an immigrant Carnegie goes from a poor boy to an influential millionaire, bestowing libraries and other gifts to citizens but early on learns to take time to enjoy life.

Carnegie learns through watching others and always giving his ute most to each task. At times he uses his influence to bully, at other times he is benevolent. A great overall view of the life and times in the 1800's and this world renown man.

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29 of 32 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars
By Redneck Professor on 14-12-10

Good value but tedious, narrator disappointing

Carnegie’s story is interesting, especially his early years and his life-long relationship with his birthplace. But the author's account often becomes one tedious detail after another, especially in part 4 in which he quotes virtually all of Carnegie’s weekly letters to an English friend in full. Grover Gardner is usually one of my favorite narrators, but he really flubbed this one. I noticed frequent and in some cases repeated mispronunciations of proper names including A.T. Mahan; no doubt there were others I didn’t catch. And he got a surprising number of plain words wrong; one I remember was prescient. Not a bad listen and good value for the money. But you have to be awfully interested in Andrew Carnegie to stick with it until the end.

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11 of 13 people found this review helpful

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