Summary

Profiles leaders of the group and explains its history of attacks Includes footnotes for further reading Includes a table of contents
"Boko Haram are better armed and are better motivated than our own troops. Given the present state of affairs, it is absolutely impossible for us to defeat Boko Haram." - Kashim Shettima, governor of Borno
On the morning of April 15, 2004, the world woke up to the extraordinary news of the kidnap in a little known hamlet of Nigeria of some 276, primarily Christian schoolgirls, by the radical militant Nigerian insurgent group Boko Haram. Almost overnight, the group, which had resided somewhat on the fringes of global consciousness up until that point, found itself at the forefront as international public outrage, culminating in a social media campaign headed by First Lady Michelle Obama, demanded the immediate return of the kidnapped girls.
Those demands, while laudable, simply served to project a hitherto local and regional jihadist movement, operating in the gray hinterland of the African Sahel region, into an organization with an international profile and a place in the pantheon of globally recognized terror organizations. If anything, the headlines have probably imbued Boko Haram with more punch than it can practically wield, for in reality the organization, at least for the time being, it remains less a jihadist movement that a localized terror insurgency with very locally defined objectives. If Boko Haram does indeed nurture international ambitions, which increasingly it appears to, then these perhaps are a fringe expression of a movement that appears in on the whole, again at least for the time being, to be too haphazard, and chaotic in its administration and leadership to really find a home amongst the larger and better known international organizations.
©2012 Charles River Editors (P)2015 Charles River Editors
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5 out of 5 stars
By Glaudrung on 02-05-18

Great for gaining an understanding of Boko Haram.

I'm a senior in college studying military history and I'll admit that before I read this all I knew about the conflict was the atrocities and special forces operations that occasionally shos up in the news. To be fair I knew more than all my friends and family, but that goes to show that too little attention is being paid to this war.

I personally don't like the term 'ethnic conflict,' since we're dealing with areas that are theoretical under one government but in every other respect are many nations with informal leadership. When different parts of the same 'state' have vastly different cultures, languages, religions, opinions, and understanding of events and institions then psychologically these are two nations and will split and the slightest dispute.

Combine this with the insulation of the many African towns from each other and the extreme poor logistics and extremely high crime rate. Throw in some radical Islam and viola! Boko Haram.

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3 out of 5 stars
By Amazon Customer on 25-01-18

Speaker has lisp or needs floss—poor performance.

Content is good, but narration is poor. Speaker has a lisp or needs to floss. The narrator also has a pronounced, non-standard, marked dialect. The reading also isn't read smoothly but harshly, i.e. a hard prosody on words and pauses. She also has some volume control and pronunciation consistency problems. This Audible reader needs a voice coach or audio director before producing more works for Amazon.

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