Summary

Ecce homo, "behold the man", are the words Friedrich Nietzsche chose as the title for his literary self-portrait. A main purpose of the book was to offer Nietzsche's own perspective on his work as a philosopher and human being. Ecce Homo also forcefully repudiates those interpretations of his previous works purporting to find support there for imperialism, anti-Semitism, militarism, and Social Darwinism.
Nietzsche strives to present a new image of the philosopher and of himself as a philosopher. He expounds upon his life as a child, his tastes as an individual, and his vision for humanity. On these grounds, some consider Ecce Homo a literary work comparable in its artistry to Van Gogh's paintings.
(P)2009 Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Show More Show Less

Regular price: £16.99

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Buy Now for £16.99

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Anonymous User on 22-07-18

how Friedrich Nietzsche became who he was

an excellent summation of the philosophy and life written by the man himself.

the sound can become a little stressed and needed to be recorded with a better microphone.

Read more Hide me
4 out of 5 stars
By Fiona on 16-10-16

One of the easiest Nietzsches books to understand

This book explains well the other books, which is a good start if you ever wanted to dwell into his other works. The ideas like in all his other books are all over the place. Every new sentence of his is filled with a complete new idea that I couldn't fully comprehend unless I read an analyzes from other sources, which disrupts the flow of the book. This is not an easy book to digest. It requires your full attention to details. I had to relisten certain chapters again and again till I fully grasped the idea and when you do actually grasp it - you feel devastated. His ideas are quite nihilistic to the point where it is unbearable. So if you think you are a negative prick try on this beast. Good luck keeping your 'God' after this one.

Read more Hide me
See all reviews

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By w22w on 24-01-10

Bombastic, Fantastic?

being a friedrich nietzsche fan, i have to say this is a curious book. he's always got the hammer close when he's writing, but in this book all tricks of literary veneer are gone and he's fully bombastic, and without any trace of irony as he lays out chapter and verse why he is: clever, wise, a great writer, pure blooded, virtuous, etc. you could trot out a few of these gems without context, but the reader would find it hard to believe.

this book reads like a diary of self adulation. i find not a lot of "philosophy" happening here , although, of course, he's a rich writer and can pack an axiom into half a sentence - ie. "that which does not kill you, makes you stronger" - found herein.

unlike his other books, this one is vertiginously self referential. he's settleling scores with newspaper critics from 1870, and telling you why you'll care in 2010 - the balls on this guy!

Nietzsche is the 19th century philosophical bete noire, and he bashes his way through your head with more lacerating truth in a sentence than you'll find in a volume of his contemporaries. read twilight of the idols / how to philosophize with a hammer if you're new to Nietzsche. and read it again!

this book is interesting mostly as a (not flattering) window to his inner personality... interesting but bizarre.

Read more Hide me

10 of 12 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Sharif on 23-04-15

Nietzsche's Joie de vivre!

I love listening to this book. The narrator manages to capture much of the nuance of Nietzsche's voice, including the sarcasm, chutzpah, and just all around joie de vivre.

Read more Hide me

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

See all reviews