• Led Zeppelin's Led Zeppelin IV (33 1/3 Series)

  • By: Erik Davis
  • Narrated by: Fred Berman
  • Length: 4 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Release date: 20-04-09
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Audible Studios
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars 3.4 (8 ratings)

Editor reviews

Led Zeppelin's fourth album is hard to name. This was a deliberate attempt by the band to strip the album of some sense of ego and to muddle critics and fans alike, choosing rather than a name to adorn the album sleeve with four mystical symbols chosen by the band. Erik Davis plunges into the heaviness of the album, trying to determine how much of its identity being steeped in magic is real and how much a put on. In any case it certainly has an album identity and is one of the most popular and hard-rockingest collections of songs of all time. Fred Berman performs the audiobook lending a constant tone of amazement part rock-doc radio personality and part dazed music fan.≤/p>
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Summary

In this wickedly entertaining and thoroughly informed homage to one of rock music's towering pinnacles, Erik Davis investigates the magic - black or otherwise - that surrounds this album. Carefully peeling the layers from each song, Davis reveals their dark and often mystical roots - and leaves the listener to decide whether this release is some form of occult induction or just an inspired, brilliantly played rock album.
©2005 Erik Davis (P)2009 Audible, Inc.
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Regular price: £9.39

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Stuart on 10-08-12

Excellent

Very in depth, comprehensive, fascinating, more so than I was expecting. Would have preferred an English accent reading it but you can't have everything!

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Billy on 05-02-13

An occult interpretation of Led Zeppelin IV

If you're interested in information about the writing and recording of Led Zeppelin IV or a traditional critical perspective on that album, look elsewhere. If the idea of an analysis of the occult symbolism of Led Zeppelin IV's lyrics and cover art with lots of time spent on Jimmy Page's interest in Aleister Crowley appeals to you, you've found the right book.

While this kind of approach might not be for everyone, I enjoyed the book enough to make it to the end. Many of the book's claims are far-fetched and the author appears to find occult significance in every place he looks, but the book was really no more ridiculous than a Dan Brown novel. If you like Led Zeppelin and enjoy the silly fun of books like the Da Vinci Code, this one might be worth a listen.

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5 of 6 people found this review helpful

1 out of 5 stars
By Am firnusb on 17-02-18

A waste of time

No real information on the making of the album which is what i would have expected to find here...no insight into the recording process, the writing and crearion of the songs...just endless conjecture and bogus theories that "could" be what the artists were aiming for. essentially, a pointless 3 hour rambling of guesswork and ludicrous theories about the albums creation. the author tries way too hard to make connections between Led Zeppelin 4 and mythology...any remotely gifted writer can write a speculation on a work of art, with the 33 1\3 series i expect to actually learn real facts! if pseuso-mythological mumbo jumbo are your thing, dive in. if you actually want to learn something about this classic album, like i did, take my advice and look elsewhere.

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