• Red Team

  • How to Succeed by Thinking Like the Enemy
  • By: Micah Zenko
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Release date: 03-11-15
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • 4 out of 5 stars 3.9 (14 ratings)

Summary

Red teaming. It is a practice as old as the Devil's Advocate, the 11th-century Vatican official charged with discrediting candidates for sainthood. Today, red teams - comprised primarily of fearless skeptics and those assuming the role of saboteurs who seek to better understand the interests, intentions, and capabilities of institutions or potential competitors - are used widely in both the public and private sector. Red teaming, including simulations, vulnerability probes, and alternative analyses, helps institutions in competitive environments to identify vulnerabilities and weaknesses, challenge assumptions, and anticipate potential threats ahead of the next special operations raid, malicious cyberattack, or corporate merger. But not all red teams are created equal; indeed, some cause more damage than they prevent.
In Red Team, national security expert Micah Zenko provides an in-depth investigation into the work of red teams, revealing the best practices, most common pitfalls, and most effective applications of these modern-day Devil's Advocates. The best practices of red teaming can be applied to the CIA, NYPD, or a pharmaceutical company, and executed correctly they can yield impressive results: red teams give businesses an edge over their competition, poke holes in vital intelligence estimates, and troubleshoot dangerous military missions long before boots are on the ground. But red teams are only as good as leaders allow them to be, and Zenko shows not only how to create and empower red teams, but also what to do with the information they produce.
Essential listening for business leaders and policymakers alike, Red Team will revolutionize the way organizations think about, exploit, compensate for, and correct their institutional strengths and weaknesses. Drawing on little-known case studies and unprecedented access to elite red teamers in the United States and abroad, Zenko shows how any group - from military units to friendly hackers - can win by thinking like the enemy.
©2015 Micah Zenko (P)2015 Brilliance Audio, all rights reserved.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Joe Morrison on 15-04-17

Not enough detail

I was hoping for more information. On the actual working of how to undertake red team operations. This was no more detailed than a wiki page

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3 out of 5 stars
By Ryan Law on 08-10-16

Dense content... Needs to be read 2 or 3 times

Not what I was expecting. In many ways red team is alot like communism... great on paper but impossible to manage in the real world.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
2 out of 5 stars
By Pax S Whitmore on 12-07-16

Repetitive

The first hour or two are good, focusing on red team best practices, but it quickly turns into a slog of repetitive anecdotes. The narration is dull and the word "moreover" is used way too often. Only made it about halfway.

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4 of 4 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By J. Stanford on 16-12-16

This book was good but repetitive.

I looked the book. But some of the content seems to repeat. It could have been made a little shorter.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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