Summary

Gabriel Oak is only one of three suitors for the hand of the beautiful and spirited Bathsheba Everdene. He must compete with the dashing young soldier Sergeant Troy and the respectable, middle-aged Farmer Boldwood. And while their fates depend upon the choice Bathsheba makes, she discovers the terrible consequences of an inconstant heart. Far from the Madding Crowd was the first of Hardy's novels to give the name Wessex to the landscape of southwest England and the first to gain him widespread popularity as a novelist. Set against the backdrop of the unchanging natural cycle of the year, the story both upholds and questions rural values with a startlingly modern sensibility.
(P)2008 Tantor
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By MaMaMason on 07-02-16

Favourite classic, well read.

Second novel I've listened to narrated by John Lee, and find him very easy to listen to.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars
By G on 24-08-10

a question of taste (isn't it always?)

Thomas Hardy stands apart among 19th century classic novel writers. The setting, the overall atmosphere and the writing style feel more modern than what you'd expect. That said, this might be a little dour for some, but it's a good story.

With this recording, I find the narrator fails to sufficiently differentiate the voices of the characters and I find him generally too monotone in his reading, though some of his rural England accents are good.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By 🇺🇸🌸DARA on 07-06-13

Another Classic!

This book truly stands the test of time. If you've read it before as I have I think you will enjoy listening to the story this time. Its such a wonderful story that should be revisited now and then. The narration is suburb. This is definitely one that I will listen to again in the future.

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12 of 12 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Harriette on 25-07-15

Such beautiful writing!

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I certainly would recommend it. I loved the descriptions of the landscape, the agricultural life,

What did you like best about this story?

The strong female character. I did hate to see her get into the disastrous entanglement with a "bounder."

What does John Lee bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He gets the local accents, and characters sound "of the period," but the dialogue is easy for an American to understand.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Gabriel shows such loyalty to Bathsheba and to the proper management of the farm--saving the crops and livestock. I was touched by Fanny's desperate situation.

Any additional comments?

I came to the novel via the new (2015) film which I also recommend. Reading the book rounds out the story. There's the interesting interlude in Bath.

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4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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