Summary

Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, is a poem, translated by Bayard Taylor, which tells the beautiful and emotional story of a man who has seen and done it all. However, despite all of his learning and education, his life still feels empty and unaccomplished. He believes wholeheartedly that there is something else out there. Faust, having exhausted all other fields of study, turns to magic for fulfillment. He summons the devil and makes a pact - that if the devil can show him something rewarding and fulfilling, he will give the devil his soul. This recording includes part I of the poem, where it concludes with Faust trying to fulfill his need for love through a woman named Gretchen, but things end up taking a tragic turn. 
©2015 A.R.N. Publications (P)2015 A.R.N. Publications
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Adam Price on 18-04-16

Terribly Read

The narrator fails completely in expressing the correct intonation which is necessary for a complete comprehension of the work. It is a droning up/down intonation which emphasises nothing and leaves you wondering whether the narrator even understood what he was reading! I wish I had listened to more of the sample before purchasing.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By jose on 22-01-17

Classic with Motivated Narrator

Everybody knows the Faust story, but the narrator goes all out with the correct meter.

It would be better if multiple voices were used, it can get confusing to know which character is talking.

Also, it would be good to know who the character is addressing. This can be like reading a Shakespeare play and not seeing the performance.

Also, I could just be an ignorant peasant that is not meant to understand the whole book. Cheers!

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful

2 out of 5 stars
By Grant Pajak on 29-03-17

Misleading

The description says that it is parts 1 and 2 but the book contained only part 1

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13 of 18 people found this review helpful

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