Summary

Dostoevsky studied human nature with passion and precision. He plumbed the depths and never winced at what he found, even when it was beyond his understanding. This extraordinary novel is a recital of his findings, told in the story of four brothers: Dimitri, pleasure-seeking, impatient, unruly; Ivan, brilliant and morose; Alyosha, gentle, loving, honest; and the illegitimate Smerdyakov, sly, silent, cruel. What gives this story its dramatic grip is the part these brothers play in their father's murder.
©1987 Jimcin Recordings
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
2 out of 5 stars
By Ian on 10-01-10

Great book - dull reading

The narrator here seems to be working on autopilot. When there is a piece of dialogue followed by something like "he said angrily", you realise that Walter Covell frequently hasn't read ahead. Most of the women's voices sound the same. He leaves hardly any gap at the end of a chapter before giving the title of the next one and moving on. The effect is rather relentless. Characters change voice as the book goes on. I had to keep replaying sections to get the meaning. He's not without expression but doesn't do this great book justice.

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4 of 4 people found this review helpful

1 out of 5 stars
By Mr on 20-02-12

Brothers Karamazov

This is as poor a rendition of a brilliant novel as it has been my misfortune to hear. The narrator seems not to have read the sentences before voicing them, frequently running out of breath before reaching their end. The result is that the ends of phrases seem to be tacked on without rhyme or reason. His struggle with the Russian names is painful, and they seem not to become any more familiar to him as the reading progresses than they were at the start. Added to that, the lack of variety in tone and tempo made the reading sound like a mechanical, text-to-speech machine. Very, very poor.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Paul Z. on 15-01-10

This book is one of the reasons I joined Audible!

I loved it! I have read this book a number of times and in different translation but it was great to listen to it while on the road.

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25 of 25 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By James on 29-10-12

I Tried Covell, Davidson, and Woolf

Any additional comments?

I tried all three narrators available for the unabridged Brothers K. I hated them all to begin with, but Covell is the one that I was able to settle into. Davidson's condescension, though I tried my best to ignore it, was just too much. Woolf and Clovell are both underwhelming, and it takes more concentration to hang on, but between them, I like Covell. In general, I've found boring narrations to be less offending to the ear across a long listening than obnoxious ones that might be more dramatic. Listening to Covell is sometimes like hearing those computer-automated voice, but it can actually become endearing after a while. In any case, while his voice didn't do anything to enhance the reading, in the end he didn't detract from it. I've read the book before, and I found the sensation of hearing Covell's reading exactly the same, whereas Davidson's narration jarred the spell completely for me.

It's a shame there is not a reading of this novel as great as Guidall's masterful Crime and Punishment, but this performance still amounts to a wonderful experience.

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23 of 23 people found this review helpful

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