Summary

When F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby in the early 1920s, the American Dream was already on the skids. Originally based on the idea that the pursuit of happiness involves not only material success but moral and spiritual growth, the dream had by Fitzgerald's time become increasingly focused on money and pleasure - a phenomenon the high-living writer was only too familiar with.
Public Domain (P)2012 Trout Lake Media
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Amazon Customer on 22-08-17

Good description let down by characters and plot

There is some beautifully rich descriptive text in this, but the characters seemed superficial and unengaging. The narrator was confusing at times because it seems told in first person, but then details are given of situations where the narrator wasn't present and it was hard to figure where the information had come from. It got a bit boring in places, such as the lengthy list of party guests.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Nicholas Evison on 17-02-18

Well said

What made the experience of listening to The Great Gatsby the most enjoyable?

The narrator was fabulous. Did a great man voice.

What did you like best about this story?

How Gatsby developed.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

SPOILER ALERT******************* The one where Gatsby meets his old flame after many years and gradually forgets his guest.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I was sad.

Any additional comments?

Typically at the ends of the chapters, Fitzgerald uses lovely visual allegories. They stick.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Philo on 05-06-12

Enjoyed this version mightily

The narrator is somewhat flamboyant, acting the various voices with panache and energy. Some will like this approach, some not.
The story took on added dimensions after I heard the elegant description ot (less developed) Long Island of that era, in the vast nonfiction "The Power Broker" by Robert Caro, a biography of New York's public works pioneer Robert Moses, who transformed the place.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Marshall on 30-05-12

Simply Beautiful

Like so many classics of the era the beginning meanders and languishes around the characters but eventually the story does get moving. Fitzgerald's prose is simply beautiful and something rare while his metaphors paint an incredible picture in your imagination.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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