Summary

In the spring of 1863, as he faces battle for the first time at Chancellorsville, Virginia, a young Union soldier matures to manhood and finds peace of mind as he comes to grips with his conflicting emotions about war.
(P)2008 Tantor
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Rosalie on 09-08-09

Red Badge of Courage

I see why this is a classic. Be sure to get the narrator, William Dufris. He is less dry than the other. A GOOD LISTEN.

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4 of 4 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars
By Nelson Mostow on 09-06-10

Narrator great. Book of historical interest.

First, I should say that the narrator did a great job in portraying several characters in a totally believable way.

The novel concerns a young man who enlists in the Civil War and fights in several battles. The perspective of the story is that of how the young man felt and reacted to his situations and how he felt about his reactions. Stephen Crane apparently bridges a gap between an older style of writing where the story was told, to a more modern style where the perspective is on the inner thoughts and feelings of the protagonist. Thus the book will be of interest to civil war buffs and those interested in tracing the progression of American Literature.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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