Summary

Set during the fierce Trojan War, Troilus and Criseyde is the poignant tale of love won and lost. The beautiful Criseyde becomes the object of desire for Troilus, the son of King Priam, and he is able to win her affection through the machinations of his uncle, Pandarus. They experience a brief time of bliss together, but despite their vows of faithfulness, they are soon separated by the fortunes of war.
Nevill Coghill's matchless translation skilfully transmits the genius and vigor of Chaucer's 14th-century romantic poem, widely regarded as his finest achievement. Listen as probably the greatest love poem of the Middle Ages comes alive, combining elements of comedy and tragedy to form an exquisite tale of romantic love and human frailty.
©1971 Nevill Coghill (P)2011 Audio Connoisseur
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4 out of 5 stars
By Bruce Herr on 26-03-15

Love Won and Lost, in Rhyme Royal

The story and the poem are matchless -- who am I to review Chaucer? The narration I found somewhat problematic. For some reason the narrator found it appropriate to use a tongue-in-cheek, almost mocking tone throughout; I would have preferred if he had played it straight up. The Rhyme Royal in which the poem is written lends itself to a sort of rollicking, sing-song cadence, which could have been minimized had the narrator not paused at the end of the enjambed lines. Thanks to Audible for making this classic available in an audio format.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars
By Kennedy on 06-08-17

Love has not much changed since the 1500s.

Love has not much changed since the 1500s. The many voices of Twitter have merely replaced the single voice of Pandarus. Oh yeah, but then Twitter is equivalent to a Greek chorus.

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