Roam

  • by Erik Therme
  • Narrated by Joe Hempel
  • 4 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Three strangers, each searching for something out of reach.
Sarah Cate, celebrating her 21st birthday, is pushed over the edge after car trouble strands her in the middle of nowhere with an angry, unstable boyfriend.
Kevin Reed, a troubled adolescent abused by a loveless father, roams the night in his black Camaro, looking to pay forward one of the few acts of kindness he's ever received.
Scotty Mason, plagued by profound guilt and completely detached from his world, is haunted by the unshakable fear that something inside him is dangerously broken and cannot be fixed.
When their lives intersect in an unsavory hotel with a bloody history, all three will struggle to exorcise their personal demons, unaware that a bigger threat is looming... and waiting for the right moment to strike.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

This did not hold my attention

I don't feel like the way that this book was put together was the best. It felt jumpy and lacking in flow. A few of the scenarios seemed repetitive. It does tackle some important issues, and some would want to know in advance there are heavy themes of domestic abuse. I really wanted this to be more cohesive so that I could understand, beyond that, what the point of it really was.

The narration was fairly good, but not a big stand out to me. I also wondered at times why it was narrated by a male reader.

I received this book in exchange for a fair and balanced review.
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- Erin Lewy

"In the fading light of Millennium Park ..."

Any additional comments?

This unusually constructed book focuses on five main characters and three, in particular, whose intertwined activities are followed over the course of one evening and night. For Sarah, this evening was to have been special: it was her birthday and she and boyfriend, Matt, were to have celebrated it together. When it all goes wrong, Sarah goes in search of old friend, Scott, hoping to stay with him overnight, if only she can find him, and is helped in her quest by a young man named Kevin, a secretly aspiring author, who offers her a lift in his car. Eventually she just books into a room at the hotel where Scott's girlfriend is the unpleasantly offensive night time receptionist. It is here that the book draws together in it's climax.

Initially, the story feels disconnected, switching, in the present tense, between locales and people, but like an elegantly drawn sketch, the full picture slowly emerges. We follow the happenings at an almost real time speed which propels the story forward in a very tactile​ way. Each of these main protagonists is cleverly drawn, slowly emerging as fully formed people with their personal sadnesses, guilts, fears and hopes. The book is filled with teenage angst and introspection, small cruelties and aggression, and I would certainly not want to live in their home town. Nor did I find any of the protagonists particularly sympathetic but they were eminently compelling, nevertheless.

Joe Hempel, as narrator, is superb. The text is read briskly, but not too fast, is clear and his use of intonation helps define the emotion.. Each of the characters, too, has a clearly distinctive voice, lending to each a further reality of their personalities. An excellent performance, and, overall, a great listen with a perfect symbiosis of author and reader. A great peek into the troubled minds of an equally troubled generation, trying to find a future where little is there to give hope, all presented in an unusual thriller. I was freely gifted a copy of Roak, at my request, by the rights holder, via Audiobook Boom. My thanks. It really does give hope that, whilst things are very likely to go wrong, sometimes they might just come out right instead. Recommended to anyone enjoying detailed character representation and a thriller that is just that little bit different.

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- Norma Miles

Book Details

  • Release Date: 11-05-2017
  • Publisher: Erik Therme