Summary

D-Day, 6 June 1944 was a victory of arms. But it was also a triumph for a different kind of operation: one of deceit, aimed at convincing the Nazis that Calais and Norway, not Normandy, were the targets of the invasion force. The deception involved every branch of Allied wartime intelligence. But at its heart was the “Double Cross System”, a team of double agents controlled by the secret Twenty Committee. The key D-Day spies were just five in number, and one of the oddest military units ever assembled: a Peruvian playgirl, a Polish fighter pilot, a Serbian seducer, a wildly imaginative Spaniard, and a hysterical Frenchwoman. Their enterprise was saved from catastrophe by a shadowy sixth spy.
©2012 Ben Macintyre (P)2012 Soundings
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By outlandish on 10-10-15

Good book, narration is little off for me.

What made the experience of listening to Double Cross the most enjoyable?

The story itself.

What did you like best about this story?

I love Ben Macintyre as an author. I love the themes of his books. This one was a little less organised than Zigzag and Mincemeat but still such a fascinating story and still well written even if it didn't match the standards Ben had set in previous books. Also, the fact that this book is about a group of characters who don't actually ever meet does make it tougher.

What three words best describe Michael Tudor Barnes’s voice?

His voice, is a little aged. He also puts on an the same 'stiff upper lip' voice for every British character, and uses the same accent for every non-British character. His pace was good though, but I'd have to say I preferred the guy who did Operation Mincemeat (better book too).

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No.

Any additional comments?

No.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By Charles on 24-06-13

Doesn't 'Quite' meet heights of his previous books

Don't get me wrong, this is still a very good book, and the narrator does an excellent job. I think the problem is that Ben Macintyre has written a book that has cast too wide a net to be fully conveyed as an audio book. There's so many parallel threads going on that I sometimes found myself trying to remember exactly which Agent was which. In a physical book, that's not a problem, as you can always flick back to double-check things for clarity. That's not an option in an audio book....

His previous two books had the benefit of either one central agent or one core operation to focus on. Here, there's a lot of different threads and different plots to try to keep track of.

Bottom line it's still a good listen, but I suggest starting with either Agent ZigZag or Operation Mincemeat first, to "ease" yourself in!

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Robyn on 31-05-14

Macintyre and Tudor Barnes - top combination!

This is a must read for anyone who is interested in WWII or who just likes a ripping and suspenseful spy story. I agree with all positive comments below. The book is beautifully written, with the occasional sardonic observation to bring a smile to your lips. The narration is perfect in every way. My only reservation has also been mentioned below - it can be difficult to keep track of the various players in audio format, but I found that with each switch between characters I quickly remembered what they were up to, so I don't consider it a reason not to read the book in audio. And listening to Michael Tudor Barnes is a treat not to be missed. I was left with just one question - could the Germans really have been THAT inept? Apparently so!

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