Summary

Of all the characters in The Seeing Stone and At the Crossing-Places, it is Gatty the village girl -- steadfast, forthright, innocent, and wise -- who has won the most hearts. This is her story, written down at her behest by her childhood friend and hero, Arthur de Caldicot. Gatty's dream is to follow Arthur to Jerusalem, though she has not even understood that Jerusalem is farther away than Ludlow, and across the sea. As he sets out on the Crusade, Gatty, unknown to him, follows. Her extraordinary journey on foot across Europe and towards the east makes a marvellous medieval adventure story.
Listen to a free interview with Kevin Crossley-Holland. Simply Click here to download.

©2006 Kevin Crossley-Holland; (P)2006 Orion Publishing Group Ltd.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Charlotte on 02-11-16

Stars and flames

Hands up to start with, KCH is my favourite author ever, so if I sound like a sycophant, that's tough.

If you've read his original Arthur trilogy (which everyone should), this is on the same level of beautiful language, vivid images, and heartbreakingly real emotion as previous stories. And the end...no, it's ok, no spoilers. It's just gorgeous though, and it's perfectly done.

I was a bit put out by the narration. It felt a bit stilted and affected, and I wasn't convinced by all the accents. I liked the way the singing was integrated into the story, for sure, though I wonder whether it might not have been nice to allow the listener to imagine it for themselves? Never mind, it was good. And the story is good enough that I can forgive the narration any shortcomings.

This is beautiful writing. But then, from KCH, what do you expect?

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