Glue

  • by Irvine Welsh
  • Narrated by Tam Dean Burn
  • 5 hrs and 45 mins
  • Abridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Glue is the story of four boys growing up in the Edinburgh schemes, and about the loyalties, the experiences, and the secrets that hold them together into their 30s. Four boys becoming men: Juice Terry, the work-shy fanny-merchant, with corkscrew curls and sticky fingers; Billy the boxer, driven, controlled, playing to his strengths; Carl, the Milky Bar Kid, drifting along to his own soundtrack; and the doomed Gally, who has one less skin than everyone else and seems to find catastrophe at every corner. As we follow their lives from the '70s into the new century, from punk to techno, from speed to Es, we can see each of them trying to struggle out from under the weight of the conditioning of class and culture, peer pressure, and their parents' hopes that maybe their sons will do better than they did. What binds the four of them is the friendship formed by the scheme, their school, and their ambition to escape from both; their loyalty fused in street morality: back up your mates, don't hit women and, most importantly, never grass, on anyone. Despite its scale and ambition, Glue has all Irvine Welsh's usual pace and vigour, crackling dialogue, scabrous set-pieces and black, black humour, but it is also a grown-up book about growing up, about the way we live our lives, and what happens to us when things become unstuck.

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What the Critics Say

"Full of incident, mad, crackling dialogue, attractively appalling characters, and some of the funniest and rudest sex scenes." (Sunday Times)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Good but not full book length

Always enjoy Irvine Welsh's stuff, but was a bit put off by the fact this has been considerably chopped down from the actual length of the book, and therefore some parts that we're vital to the plot we're cut out and non necessary one's weren't.
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- Amazon Customer

Disappointing revisit to an old fave

Read this years ago, so thought I'd revisit it as I'd forgotten some of the story. Remembered particularly enjoying the Munich festival part of the book though. Very disappointed to find it was cut from the audio. I'm wondering what else was cut now as well. Production quality was, as Welsh would it, 'pish'. Plenty of background hiss on most, but not all chapters. That said, Tam Burn was, as ever, an excellent narrator.
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- Daniel J Osborne

Book Details

  • Release Date: 08-02-2006
  • Publisher: Random House AudioBooks