Summary

Here is the story of two families, branches of the Solomons, transported to an alien land. Both branches eventually grow rich and powerful. But through three generations, the families never, for one moment, relinquish their hatred for each other. This novel is also the story of Australia, from its beginnings to its coming of age as a nation.
©2013 Christine Courtenay (P)2014 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd
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Critic reviews

"Narrator Humphrey Bower doesn't miss a nuance. His villains have a sharp, nasal nastiness, and his love scenes tickle the hairs at the nape of the neck. Bower's performance is spot-on." ( Audiofile)
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Regular price: £32.89

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Sharon on 21-03-09

The best audio book I have ever listened to

A monumental look at Australian life in times of war and peace. The depiction of the cause and effect of Australia's participation in world wars and especially their role at Galipoli heart rendering and traumatic and makes one wonder as to their ill-founded patriotism for the mother country for which most Australian soldiers were unprepared for. A truly magnificent and enthralling book superbly narated by Humphrey Bower. I was devastated when I got to the end of the audio book and found that Bryce Courtenay hadn't written a sequel. Anybody wanting an insight into Australian life from 1800s onwards would be hard pressed to find a better book.

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4 of 4 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By sally on 21-01-11

Enjoyable listening

Another enjoyable book from Bryce Courtenay. It follows the Saga and family rivally from the previous two books. This one neatly follows on from Tommo and Hawk answering questions left from that story. The new generation has thier own dilemas and trauma as the story weaves through those into the first world war.
It did leave me feeling there is plenty of room for a further book.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Bernadine Martin on 13-11-09

Seems to get off the track

I loved The Potato Factory and Tommo and Hawk. I also liked Solomon's Song but it didn't seem to hang together with the first two books. Courtenay should have written a separate book about the First World War and had the third book continued with the saga started in the first two books. A good share of the third book was Ben and the war,little about the Hawk/Benjamin, Joshua/Ben relationahip and the business.

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19 of 19 people found this review helpful

1 out of 5 stars
By Woodcarver on 22-04-11

Series ran out steam

I really enjoyed The Potato Factory, began losing interest while listening to Tommo and Hawk, and finally could not get the past first third of this book Even the superb reading by Humphrey Bower could not save it. The recycling of plot elements, the improbable behavior on the part of the characters as well as the unrealistic relationships between those characters, the cringe-worthy explicit sex descriptions complete with sound effects, and the predictability of most of the conflicts sent me back to listening to Patrick O'Brian yet again with a sigh of relief.

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15 of 15 people found this review helpful

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