Summary

The Druids have been known and discussed for at least 2,400 years, first by Greek writers and later by the Romans, who came in contact with them in Gaul and Britain. According to these sources, they were a learned caste who officiated in religious ceremonies, taught the ancient wisdoms, and were revered as philosophers. But few figures flit so elusively through history, and the Druids remain enigmatic and puzzling to this day.
In this Very Short Introduction, one of the leading authorities on British archaeology, Barry Cunliffe, takes the listener on a fast-paced look at the ever-fascinating story of the Druids, as seen in the context of the times and places in which they practiced. Sifting through the evidence, Cunliffe offers an expert's best guess as to what can be said and what can't be said about the Druids, discussing the origins of the Druids and the evidence for their beliefs and practices, why the nature of the druid caste changed quite dramatically over time, and how successive generations have seen them in very different ways.
In a hurry? Listen to more Very Short Introductions.
©2010 Barry Cunliffe (P)2011 Audible, Inc.
Show More Show Less

Regular price: £11.89

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Privacy Notice.

Buy Now for £11.89

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Privacy Notice.

By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Privacy Notice.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
1 out of 5 stars
By Chris on 23-08-11

Not recommended

All that becomes apparent from this work is that very little is known about the Druids. The text is padded out extensively with peripheral information not bearing on Druids directly. Having listened to this I am little more informed about Druids than I was before I started.

Read more Hide me

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By Jim on 03-09-11

Absolutley fascinating but very strange narration

An wonderfully engaging attempt to survey everything known about the druids including a look at the sources of our knowldge and the origins of a range of modern and recent myths thrown up by neo-pagans. Potentially demoralising if you're a wiccan. Gripping if you just want an insight into the origins of Western European culture. This would have easily been a five star but for the incredibly eccentric narration. Not being a welsh speaker I can't speak with absolute authority but even an Englishman knows that Eisteddfod isn't pronounced istedfart and only the Welsh tourist board would want Glamorgan to be pronounced glamour-gan. Despite all that this is a must for history fans

Read more Hide me

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

See all reviews

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Marc on 24-07-11

Meets Expectations

I found this to be a very good read/listen. It delivered what it promised: a well written general overview that differentiated between evidence-based information and myth/lore.

Read more Hide me

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By melecona on 23-06-11

Very Short Introductions is the best collection!!

Very Short Introductions is the best collection!! Please, we definitely need more from this series!!

Druids have fascinated popular imagination for over two thousand years. In recent years, they have enjoyed revived interest due largely to the emergence of various New Age and earth-based spiritual and religious movements. And yet, despite all the fascination with them, we still don't know much about who they were and what sorts of beliefs and practices they were involved in. This is primarily due to the fact that the pagan societies within which Druids operated did not leave any written records. Hence, all that we know about Druids stems from the physical archeological evidence they left behind, and the writings of outsiders.

This very short introduction tries to shed more light on Druids for the modern reader. It presents a fascinating history of the ancient world within which Druids operated. It shatters a few myths about Druids and reconfirms some other long held beliefs. In particular, even though it is unclear whether Druids themselves conducted human sacrifices, it is fairly well established that those were common in ancient pagan societies and that Druids at the very least condoned them. The book also gives a nice overview of the revival of the interest in Druids that started with the European romanticism roughly in the nineteenth century. Most of our images of Druids can actually be traced to that period, and it is amusing to note that many of the purportedly Druidic practices that some neopagan groups engage in were actually invented in this period.

Read more Hide me

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

See all reviews