Summary

Sergeant Charles Windolph was the last white survivor of the Battle of Little Big Horn when he told his story nearly 70 years later. A six-year veteran in the Seventh Cavalry, Windolph rode in the 1873 Yellowstone Expedition, and the 1874 Black Hills Expedition. He fought in Captain Benteen's troops on the fatal Sunday, and vividly recalls the battle that wiped out Custer's command. Equally vivid is the evidence marshaled by historians Frazier and Robert Hunt.
©1894 Frazier & Robert Hunt (P)2003 Book in Motion
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Carl on 19-04-11

Absorbing

Totally enjoyed this book, and felt as though I was there, to hear the old soliders recollection of this famous historic event was gripping. Anybody who has an interest in the wild west, or Custer will enjoy this aspect of the events.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By peter on 13-04-11

Authentic Account

If you are a Custer, military or American History addict, this should keep you happy. I greatly enjoyed the narrator's style who made me feel I was sitting down with the Old Sargeant. Listening to someone who was there at the Little Big Horn; hearing about his friends; how his regiment looked after Commanche, the horse that was the only living thing to survive on the Cavalry's side; how they found the body of Custer. So much better than the endless surveys of who said what and did what with orders and whose fault it was. Just the facts, as remembered by the reminiscences of a Medal of Honor recipient; reflections on Custer at the personal level; his love and respect for Captain Bentine; his fond memories of comrades. And that indelible integrity of an old soldier who had seen it all.

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4 of 4 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Neil on 06-11-12

First Person Account

Sgt. Windolph was a German Immigrant who left Germany to avoid another European conflict, and ends up in the army as their were no other jobs in the US. I had recently read "The Last Stand" which was excellent and this is a great addition as Windolph was with Benteen and Reno's groups. This is a great account of those days in June, and it adds others as the interview with Windolph is only part of this book. He even goes over the period as they went to see the remains of Custers last stand as there were no immigrant survivors in Custers battle.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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