Summary

The window between two equally stifling autocracies - the imperial family and the communists - was open only briefly, in the last couple of years of the 19th century until the end of WWI, by which time the revolution was in full fury.
From the last years of Tolstoy until the death of the Tsar and his family, however, Russia experimented with liberalism and cultural openness. In Europe, the Ballet Russe was the height of chic. Novelists and playwrights blossomed, political ideas were swapped in coffee houses, and St. Petersburg felt briefly like Vienna or Paris. The state, however, couldn't tolerate such experimentation against the backdrop of a catastrophic war and a failing economy. The autocrats moved in and the liberals were overwhelmed. This story seems to have strangely prescient echoes of the present.
©2017 Mikhail Zygar (P)2017 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books
Show More Show Less

Regular price: £32.89

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Buy Now for £32.89

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By MR on 25-05-18

Absolutely brilliant!

This is a superbly dynamic retelling of the years leading up to the October Revolution. As a historian I was wary of how a journalist might use the sources. I couldn't have been more wrong. His researches and interpretation have produced a vivid, exciting, and truly memorable illumination of the time by focusing on the personal experiences of many of the main characters directly involved in how the changing pattern of events played out.

Read more Hide me
5 out of 5 stars
By Charles Palmer on 03-01-18

superb, a hugely important contribution

to the history of the world's worst man made catastrophe. for the last 30 years I have been a scholar of Russian history and this book contextualized the most extraordinary event.

doubly relevant today, when the evil of Bolshevism appears to have been consciously forgotten.

Read more Hide me

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

See all reviews

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By brian on 22-06-18

An excellent look at an interesting history.

A documentary format, if you will, through old diary and other forms to look on those interesting and dark days. Narration by Simon Vance is excellent as always, a narrator I love to hear, among many others, American and British.

Read more Hide me
4 out of 5 stars
By Jason Close on 21-05-18

This was a decent history book.

This book was done well. It has a good ratio of data-to-anecdote. Your won't get lost in the weeds too much with repetitive listing of dates and people, but that info is included where relevant.

It will give you a good grounding on how the stage was set for the Communist regime of early 20th century.

Read more Hide me
See all reviews