Summary

The U.S. Constitution was approved by the Constitutional Convention on September 17, 1787. It was to become law only if it was ratified by nine of the 13 states. New York was a key state, but it contained strong forces opposing the Constitution. A series of 85 letters appeared in New York City newspapers between October 1787 and August 1788 urging support for the Constitution. These letters remain the first and most authoritative commentary on the American concept of federal government. Later known as The Federalist Papers, they were published under the pseudonym "Publius", although written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay. This presentation explores the major arguments contained in The Federalist Papers and contrasts them with the views of the Anti-Federalists.
(P)1986 Carmichael and Carmichael, Inc. and Knowledge Products
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Ms. MP DELPECHE on 15-01-17

They were flawed

They were flawed and genius all at the same time. I can't say I could teach a course on the papers as I have just fully understood what they represent and it amazing.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
1 out of 5 stars
By Joy on 10-06-07

Anti-Fed Fed Book

I was thinking I was getting some actual Federalist Papers, not commentary on them, so I was disappointed right away. Then, I was even more disappointed with the worldview of the author--he was about as anti-federalist as he could possibly be. After reading Chernow's Alexander Hamilton this author's view of Hamilton seemed a warped cariature, rather than a balanced look at his writings or goals for America. I do not recommend this book at all. I wish audible would offer the actual unabridged Federalist Papers themselves, instead, so we could make our own judgment about their content.

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64 of 65 people found this review helpful

1 out of 5 stars
By John K on 02-03-09

Deceptively titled; simplistic.

The first two reviewers have it right. Blackstone/Audible need to clearly indicate that this is a very unsophisticated commentary with, as has been noted, a very distinct bias. We still need an audible version of the complete and unabridged Papers. Don't bother with this. I'd give it no stars, if I could.

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27 of 29 people found this review helpful

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