The Gentry

  • by Adam Nicolson
  • Narrated by David Fleeshman
  • 16 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Prize-winning author Adam Nicolson tells the story he was born to write – the real story of England. It is the gentry that has made England what it was and, to a degree, still is. In this vivid, lively book, history has never been more readable.
We may well be ‘a nation of shopkeepers’, but for generations England was a country dominated by its middling families, rooted on their land, in their locality, with a healthy interest in turning a profit from their property and a deep distrust of the centralised state. The virtues we may all believe to be part of the English culture – honesty , affability, courtesy, liberality – each of these has their source in gentry life cultivated over five hundred years. These folk were the backbone of England.
Adam Nicolson’s riveting new book concentrates on fourteen families with a time-span from 1400 to the present day. From the medieval gung-ho of the Plumpton family to the high-seas adventures of the Lascelles in the 18th-century, to more modern examples, the book provides a chronological picture of the English, seen through these intimate, passionate, powerful stories of family saga. The families have been selected from all over the country and range from the famous to the unknown. Some families are divided by politics , such as the family that took different sides in the Reformation; others destroy their inheritance through reckless gambling or investments . All of them are vivid depictions of the life and code of the gentry, and have left deep archives of family papers which the author has been able to use, often for the very first time.
The Gentry is first and foremost a wonderful sweep of English history. It presents a convincing argument on what has created the distinctive English character but with the sheer readability of an epic novel.

More

What the Critics Say

"‘A masterpiece of rural romanticism, told with shameless lyricism…the narrative of his struggle is charmingly interspersed with tales from Sissinghurst's past…all is warmed by Nicolson's evocation of Sissinghurst's natural history…the vision is one of nature, art and human history in glorious coalition, the essence of the Englishman's sense of place….this uplifting book.' (Sunday Times)
"Nicolson's book is one of those rare things: a story that seems small, irrelevant to most of us, rarefied in its history, full of detail about land rights and Trust guidelines, and yet which blooms in front of our eyes into a much larger, more important, more universal one…It's a beautiful, fascinating, touching account." (The Scotsman)

More

See More Like This

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

well written and with a lyrical quality

If you could sum up The Gentry in three words, what would they be?

informed, intimate history


Who was your favorite character and why?

The earlier families - as I personally am more drawn to that period of history


What does David Fleeshman bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Well tbh if I had the time I would read the book as preference - but have little time to just sit and read so use audible so I can listen and drive


Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

When some of the families finally died out


Any additional comments?

The questions in the review seem to assume this is fiction - its actually well researched fact - though I suspect Nicolson has leaned on the work of other researchers.

Read full review

- twigs way

Book Details

  • Release Date: 27-10-2011
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Limited