• The Myth of the Lost Cause

  • Why the South Fought the Civil War and Why the North Won
  • By: Edward H. Bonekemper III
  • Narrated by: C.J. McAllister
  • Length: 9 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Release date: 14-07-16
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Regnery History
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 (2 ratings)

Summary

The former Confederate states have continually mythologized the South's defeat to the North, depicting the Civil War as unnecessary, or as a fight over states' Constitutional rights, or as a David v. Goliath struggle in which the North waged "total war" over an underdog South. In The Myth of the Lost Cause, historian Edward Bonekemper deconstructs this multi-faceted myth, revealing the truth about the war that nearly tore the nation apart 150 years ago.
©2015 Edward H. Bonekemper III (P)2016 Regnery Publishing
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Adam on 11-02-17

Indisputable proofs, flawless argumentation.

I am about four hours into this audiobook. And I am a rabid champion of the State's rights and found some resonance with the arguments I had heard, to the effect that the Civil war was far more about the rights of the States than it was about slavery (while at the same time finding slavery absolutely deplorable). About one hour in, I had every myth exploded and many times over disproven.

Which ever side you lean towards, you must account for the facts presented herein if you want to hold your beliefs honestly.

The Civil war WAS primarily about slavery.
If you hesitate to affirm that proposition wholeheartedly, read this book to erase any doubt in your mind. Or write a book answering to the facts presented here, and once you have finished, read your book and see to what extent you have evaded reality, tortured language and twisted history to make your case.

The narrator did an excellent job as well.

I was voluntarily provided this free review copy audiobook by the author, narrator, or publisher.

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20 of 21 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Sean Lowman on 05-02-17

Want to understand the Civil War? Read this book.

Would you consider the audio edition of The Myth of the Lost Cause to be better than the print version?

I have not read the print version of this book. But I believe this one would have the same disadvantages as most history audiobooks do. First, no maps. Descriptions of battles and tactics, no matter how good, will not have the same impact without maps to look at. This could be remedied by listening to the book while looking at maps online. Second, no footnotes. As a historian, I like to be able to find the original sources for the many quotes and other facts given in the text. There are so many in this book that I would really like to see in their original context. I would recommend getting the print version just to look at the maps and footnotes, while listening to the audiobook.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Ulysses S Grant was my favorite character. The reexamination of Grant's performance in the Civil War made an excellent case for the argument that Grant was a superior general to Robert E. Lee. Especially the in depth look at the Vicksburg campaign.

Have you listened to any of C.J. McAllister’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

This is the first time I have heard C.J. McAllister narrate an audiobook. I found his voice to be clear and strong. He doesn't rush through the text like some narrators. He allows an appropriate amount of time for pauses between sentences and paragraphs, giving me a moment to take in what I have just heard. I also appreciate that he didn't attempt to do southern accents while reading quotes from the various southern politicians and generals that are quoted in the book. I find that sort of thing to be unnecessary in a history book. Overall, I think McAllister is one of the better narrators I have listened to. If he were to narrate other books on topics I enjoy, I would be more inclined to pick them up.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I would have really enjoyed listening to this in one sitting. It isn't one of those dry history books that you need to take a break from frequently. The text is well written, and its delivered in a manner that makes it easy to get caught up in. If I should ever find myself on a 9 hour car ride, I may give this one another spin.

Any additional comments?

As a historian, I often find myself engaged in the same argument over an over again: What was the cause of the Civil War? I have my share "go to" resources to back the argument that the principal cause of the war was slavery. But Bonekemper goes above and beyond the call of duty by finding documents, quotes, facts, and figures all aimed at disproving the persistent claim that slavery was not the cause of the Civil War, as well as other spurious claims that together make up the Lost Cause myth. With this book, I now have a seemingly unending supply of evidence to reach for whenever I end up in yet another Civil War argument.

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9 of 9 people found this review helpful

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