• Pulp Physics

  • Astronomy: Humankind in Space and Time
  • By: Dr. Richard Berendzen
  • Narrated by: Richard Berendzen
  • Length: 9 hrs and 35 mins
  • Original Recording Audiobook
  • Release date: 16-05-00
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The Publishing Mills
  • 4 out of 5 stars 3.8 (11 ratings)

Editor reviews

Dr. Berendzen has a very unique talent: he speaks extemporaneously and manages to sound as though he's reading from a book or a script. Of course, it helps that he has an exhaustive knowledge of his subject - Berendzen is to physics what Seuss was to rhyming couplets. Pulp Physics is a remarkably informative program, bringing even the scientifically inept immediately into a concrete understanding of the universe around them. It's very much like sitting in on a long and interesting lecture by a profound professor. Highly recommended! (Leslie G.)
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Summary

In this unscripted recording, renowned astrophysicist Dr. Richard Berendzen takes you on a journey through space and time that is captivating from the moment he begins to speak. Acting as your personal tour guide through the galaxy, Dr. Berendzen enthusiastically shares his expertise in this conventional - yet comprehensive - introduction to physics and astronomy. Enjoy the best of both worlds: an expert's knowledge in a user-friendly format!
©2000 by Dr. Richard Berendzen (P)2000 by The Publishing Mills
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Regular price: £20.29

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Anonymous User on 24-03-18

A Great Cosmic Story

Loved it from start to finish. This book is very accessible for all science lovers.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Dell on 08-10-04

Pulp Physics is insightful history

This book has fascinating insights into many historical situations of physics. It carries its message in simple conversational style. It is almost complete to the present day. It's omission is the acceleration of expansion of the galaxies. I am a 30 year teacher of college physics, now retired. I believe anyone from highschool to graduate school would be well served in understanding the progress of science by reading this book(or listening). The coverage is broad, but he has wonderful treatements of Galileo, Newton, Einstein, and cosmology in general. I recommend this book without reservation.

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By Allen on 09-08-03

Pulp Physics

This is an excellent introduction to science and ought to be required listening (or reading) for novice and expert physicists/astronomers alike. Dr. Berendzen's folksy style plays very well in audio format and is very enjoyable even in the low-fidelity formats (1,2). I have only one factual quibble with Dr. Berendzen's material - Galileo's eye problems were not caused by sighting the sun directly through a telescope. It is well known that Galileo observed the sun indirectly by veiwing a projection of the sun on a piece of notebook paper on which he traced the sunspots. Rather, it was Galileo's habit of sharing his telescope eyepieces with many people that facilitated infection of his eyes.

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4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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