Summary

More than 3,000 years have passed since the first events recorded in Dune. Only one link survives with those tumultuous times: the grotesque figure of Leto Atreides, son of the prophet Paul Muad'Dib, and now the virtually immortal God Emperor of Dune. He alone understands the future, and he knows with a terrible certainty that the evolution of his race is at an end unless he can breed new qualities into his species. But to achieve his final victory, Leto Atreides must also bring about his own downfall.
Don't miss other titles in the Dune series.
©1981 Frank Herbert (P)2008 Macmillan Audio
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Critic reviews

"A fourth visit to Arrakis that is every bit as fascinating as the other three - every bit as timely." ( Time)
"Rich fare...Heady stuff." ( Los Angeles Times)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Zplintz on 19-01-17

Love this book.

Mind bending scale of structure, space and thought.

I would advise reading/listening to the previous books in the series first though.

Very well read.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By jerry on 24-01-10

The saga contrinues

If you loved the three precceding books this serves up another dose of spice for you, while less of a hero story than Dune and chilren of Dune there are certainly enough moments to keep you hooked, oh and it sets up the story for herctics and chapter house nicely. Enjoy

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Joel D Offenberg on 03-12-09

Almost as good as the original

God Emperor of Dune compares well with the original Dune, better than the previous two sequels (Dune Messiah and Children of Dune). It doesn't quite measure up to the standard of the first book, but few books, anywhere, do.

Warning: God Emperor of Dune is the third sequel to Dune. Ignore this book until you are familiar with Dune and the first 2 sequels.

It is 3500 years since Leto II Atreides donned his living sandtrout armor. Leto is now a living deity as well as galactic emperor...prescient, super-intelligent, supremely strong, vengeful...and more sandworm than man. Arrakis is now lush and green; the sandworms (except for Leto) are all but extinct. There is no more spice, excepting centuries-old stockpiles.

This is Leto's Golden Path...the future for humanity that he foresaw and planned 3500 years ago.

Like most of Herbert's Dune books, this book has an operatic feel...it moves slowly and most of the book is taken up with dialogue. The story really is the people, their motives and their schemes. This book revolves almost entirely around the title character (more so than the prior books), but, then, the God Emperor is the dominant story of this time and place.

The narration is very well done; Simon Vance narrates most of the book, with Katherine Kellgren reading the occasional female-dominated chapter and Scott Brick delivering the epigraphs at the start of each chapter. Three excellent readers who did a great job.

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25 of 25 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Thomas on 05-07-08

Excellent production

Frank Herbert's Dune series are among my all time favorite books. God Emperor is by far my favorite of the series. I have been waiting anxiously for the release of this production. I have not been disappointed. The story is at least as compelling in audio as it is in print. This production does the job excellently.

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19 of 20 people found this review helpful

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