Summary

Dash and Dot—husband and wife; self-professed descendants of aliens from the M31 galaxy—are the world’s most in-demand lecturers on the UFO circuit. They live in a decommissioned church in the middle of America, with a radar dish on its steeple and a spaceship in the sanctuary. Their children have the run of the house when Dash and Dot are away. When a couple of UFO groupies show up looking for the extraterrestrial duo, they find instead a nuclear family—or rather, a family gone nuclear—whose comically discomforting world resembles our own as much as it does another world altogether.
©1988 Stephen Wright (P)2014 Audible, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

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3 out of 5 stars
By D. Oxford on 08-05-16

Time out of mind!

This may have been published in the 80's but it's very 60's in attitude. I mean - this guy MUST have been tripping; the narrative as such is constantly broken up with free-association rambling, like he's been pasting in all his unused favourite random phrases that he'd collected during therapy sessions. I've a feeling some will think this a work of genius, others just somewhat over-explicit garbage; me I tend toward the latter view. I must say the narrator gave it everything, so maybe he's in the former camp.

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