The Lazarus Prophecy

  • by F.G. Cottam
  • Narrated by Sean Barrett
  • 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

There is a killer loose on the streets of London, one that evades security cameras, is not held by locks, and savagely mutilates his victims. When the murderer switches from unknown prostitutes to Julie Longmuir, a beautiful actress at the height of her success, no woman feels safe. As the press begin to draw uncomfortable comparisons with Jack the Ripper, Jane Sullivan, heading up the police investigation, grudgingly has to agree. But the religious writing, scrawled on the wall in Julie Longmuir's blood, is outside Jane's area of expertise. Roping in Jacob Prior, a disillusioned theologian, they attempt to pick apart the demonic delusions of this Ripper copycat. They must act quickly, as events are spiralling out of control, and Jane is next on the killer's list.
Jane will be tested beyond the limits of standard police work, as the esoteric insinuates itself into the investigation. For events are linked to the clandestine Priory in the Pyrenees, the home of a secret Christian sect that pre-dates the Knights Templar. Jane and Jacob are faced with a deeper mystery than they had ever dreamed of; are they simply dealing with a psychopath, or is this something bigger, is this The End of Days?

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Excellent novel, excellently narrated.

Would you listen to The Lazarus Prophecy again? Why?

Such a detailed and intriguing plot and excellently wrought descriptions and characterisation, superbly narrated will mean that I will certainly listen to this book again.


What did you like best about this story?

This is the second novel of Cottam's I have listened to and it is so vastly superior in terms of thematic complexity and written skill that it could almost be by a different author. It reminded me a little of The Name of The Rose and did not shy away from religious or moral debate; avoiding the stereotype of the peodophilic Catholic priest was also refreshing.


What does Sean Barrett bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

The narration by Sean Barrett is a particular highlight. His rendering, partially of foreign accents, are flawless and make this a real 'performance' rather than just a reading.


Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Absolutely! In fact, I even downloaded it onto my phone so I could continue listening while doing errands away from my iPad.


Any additional comments?

A few previous reviews have criticised Cottam for straying away from familiar territory. I'm glad that he had the courage to do so. I think the skill with which he achieves this complex and rather chilling commentary regarding themes not only common to people across cultures but also recognising concerns that are apparent through millennia, impressively deep compared to the enjoyable but, by comparison, rather vapid work that he has previously produced. One reviewer even criticised, and expected a refund for, content (which he found unpalatable) that was clearly detailed in the blurb - what fools these mortals be!

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- K

5 stars all round

What made the experience of listening to The Lazarus Prophecy the most enjoyable?

The superb reading by Sean Barrett. His understated style matched perfectly the dark subject matter. I found myself listening not to Sean, but to the characters themselves and to my own thoughts expressing the descriptive parts. I suppose that was what you might call an immersive experience, and it was made possible by the skill of the reader whose own character did not intrude.


What did you like best about this story?

The plot brings a fresh approach to the serial killer story, linking it to a subtle supernatural element. I know that is not to everyone's taste, but I enjoyed it. At its root it was an intriguing tail of basic good versus evil. I have a theology degree and know that there is no 'Lazarus Prophecy' and no secret order of the Gospel of St John set up by Peter, the first leader of the Christian Church. However I still had to remind myself from time to time that this was a work of fiction. It was good, too, to see the Catholic Church treated a bit more seriously. I suspect that this is a book that Dan Brown would wish he had written, and never could in a hundred years.


What does Sean Barrett bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

He doesn't allow his personality to intrude. He lets the story do the talking. Of course, his voice is very easy to listen to, and he always seems to find the truth of the characters - you can't imagine them in any other voice. I particularly liked his reading of the irishman's journal.


Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Yes. I was utterly absorbed by it, and found the two confrontations with the killer almost unbearably tense.


Any additional comments?

I hesitated over buying this recording. Some other reviews gave me cause to doubt. I am very glad I took a chance on it. It's one of the very best available from Audible.

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- D. Donnelly-Wood

Book Details

  • Release Date: 25-09-2014
  • Publisher: Audible Studios