Editor reviews

H. G. Wells’ 1897 novel, The Invisible Man, is a canonical work of science fiction, but more people know the story than have actually delved into it. Thomas E. Fuller’s audio dramatization takes full advantage of the source material to create an irresistible yarn about science’s ability to corrupt.
A mysterious stranger named Griffin arrives in the town of Iping. His face is covered in dark glasses and bandages. Griffin’s plan to reverse the invisibility process that he invented goes awry when his secret is uncovered. Out of desperation, the mad scientist steals and kills.
Doug Kaye brings desperate intensity to his performance as Griffin in this Atlanta Radio Theatre Company adaptation, which features a haunting score from Alton Leonard.
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Summary

The small English town of Iping is just a waystation on the main road to Port Braddock. Nothing ever happens in Iping: Not in the dead of winter with the snow thick and crisp on the ground. Not with the wind howling and the ice crunching underfoot. Not until the Stranger came with his thick dark glasses and his head wrapped in bandages. Not until the Invisible Man arrived.H. G. Wells' The Invisible Man is one of the true classics of science fiction, as frightening and fresh now as it was when it was first written. For there is terror in doors that open with no one behind them, in footsteps in empty halls, in a touch in an empty room. And for Griffin, the Invisible Man, there is terror in the discovery of what it is to be both powerful - and powerless.This is a full-cast, soundscaped audio dramatization of the H. G. Wells classic.
© and (P)2001 Atlanta Radio Theatre Company
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
2 out of 5 stars
By Marcher Lord on 27-10-15

Awful accents

This production has used an American cast attempting and failing dismally to speak in English accents . This may pass for US audiences but is cringeworthy to British ones . However , the storyline is acceptable .

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5 out of 5 stars
By Highlight on 13-02-15

FUN

This is an odd but fun old fashioned production which comes across in the same style as a black & white film & this is why I like it. Its quirky. A bit short but so funny.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Admiralu on 16-10-17

Entertaining Radio Drama

This is an excellent production of the classic HG Wells story. The cast was excellent. The drama was easy to follow, the character voices superb and easy to distinguish. I had no trouble following the story. I was surprised to find that this was not a BBC production. The British accents were perfect and the Invisible Man himself was chilling indeed. The narration was excellent as well. A terrific audio drama, worth your time.

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4 out of 5 stars
By al on 29-03-16

Worth the to listen. Glad it was suggested.

Loved it. though the time the story was set in was different it seems eerily familiar.

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