Summary

After participating in the Jacobite Rising of 1745, Robin and Prudence, brother and sister, become engaged in a swashbuckling, romantic adventure. Our hero and heroine must cross-dress and switch genders if they are to escape prosecution a humorous move that allows Heyer to explore the manners and language affectations of the period as the two romp through the elite saloons and clubs of London. But what the two don't foresee is that they might fall in love along the way: Prudence with the elegant and dashing Sir Anthony Fanshawe, and Robin with the charming Letitia Grayson. Can the two unmask themselves without losing their lives?
PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.
©1928 Georgette Heyer (P)2014 Naxos AudioBooks
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Sheila on 13-05-14

Great Story let down by the narrator

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

Yes, I did enjoy it but it could have been so much better.

Who was your favorite character and why?

The Old Gentleman who is witty, funny and completely over the top.

Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Ruth Sillers?

Phyllida Nash

Was The Masqueraders worth the listening time?

All of the Heyer canon are brilliant even with a bad narrator and abridged, although that is a real sin.

Any additional comments?

No, just to reiterate that narrators make a real difference to a book and even if you have read it before it can still be spoiled.

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12 of 13 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars
By Maggie on 26-07-14

Very different from the 'Regency' books

Any additional comments?

Anyone who has only read/heard Georgette Heyer's books set in the early 18thC, the years around Waterloo, will find everything about this one different. That goes for clothes to behaviour to even the language and forms of speech. I think this shows how skilled she was - 1746, the aftermath of Culloden, sits almost as close to Pepys, the Great Fire of London etc as it does to post-Waterloo and Ms Heyer brings us to a very different world. The plot involves an Adventurer and his son and daughter who have lived on their wits across Europe since the younger two's childhood. The brother and sister adopt cross-gender disguises to avoid arrest after the failure of the '45, but find themselves in the heart of London society (a society long before any thought of Almacks). Their father then stuns them by arriving in London very publicly, taking what to them is a very dangerous gamble. There is humour, but not as much as other books, there are sword fights, villains and highwaymen, and there are some well drawn characters in Prue (the sister), Sir Anthony, the seemingly indolent onlooker, and personally I love John, the manservant, who deserves a medal. My favourite scene, which is the reason I've read the book more than once over the years, is the denouement of my Lord's claim (no spoilers). I have to agree with the other reviewers though - the reading is never more than adequate but you do get used to it, after a slow start, as the book progresses.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Patricia on 14-05-14

Intrigue, romance, loyalty and wit!

Any additional comments?

Thank you Naxos for another unabridged Georgette Heyer audio book. I was thrilled when I found this and "Venetia." Glad tidings for her legions of fans. Thank you Audible for making these available for your listeners.

This is a highly entertaining story with all the usual hallmarks that make Heyer's books so exceptionally wonderful. There is no one to match her clever plotting, vivid characters, witty dialogue, and humorous scenes

The narrator was perfect for the book. Her voice is clear and pure and captured Peter's (Prudence's) lovely personality, courage and loyal heart while handling the male characters with equal skill.

An exciting story set before the Regency, I highly recommend this delightful book.

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27 of 28 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By Carole T. on 13-11-14

Swashbuckle City!

Most of Georgette Heyer's best known romances are set in the fairly sedate English Regency period at the beginning of the 19th century, but "The Masqueraders" takes place a couple of generations before that. The Hanoverian King George I has recently defeated the Stuart line of Bonny Prince Charles, so the politics are more unsettled and dangerous at this point in time. The French Revolution is 50 years in the future, so English aristocrats still emulate their continental counterparts in lavish dress, speech, and exaggerated manners. Duels are common and pretty much tolerated in a fairly permissive society.

Add to this exotic setting a couple of young adventurers, Prudence and Robin, who assume gender-bending disguises to obscure their politically- and socially-suspect past. Confused prospective lovers, a couple of duels and carriage chases, and an oh-so-eccentric father add complications and hijinks galore.

The story and characters are alternately charming and frustrating, as is the somewhat antiquated language assumed by the author. I believe that Ruth Sillers does a wonderful job of presenting this hodgepodge of French-accented and mannered English without often resorting to an overly arch tone.

I still prefer the Regencies, but "The Masqueraders" does offer some memorable characters, stirring action sequences, and a change in style and tone.

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10 of 10 people found this review helpful

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